Quinidine Gluconate

Drug List

Quinidine Gluconate

Drug Name

Quinidine Gluconate (Quinidine)

Manufactured By

Eli Lilly and Company

Drug Savings

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Treats Disease/Condition

Uses

This medication is used to treat or prevent many types of irregular heartbeats (heart arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation). Quinidine can greatly improve your ability to perform normal activities by decreasing the number of irregular heartbeats you have. However, it may not stop all your irregular heartbeats completely. It works by blocking abnormal heartbeat signals. Before and while you are using quinidine, your doctor may prescribe other medications (e.g., "blood thinners"/anticoagulants such as warfarin, beta blockers such as metoprolol) to shrink any blood clots in the heart and to slow your pulse. Quinidine may also be used to treat malaria.

How To Use

Before starting this drug, the manufacturer recommends that you take a test dose (usually a smaller amount than your regular dose) to determine whether you are allergic to it. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for details. Take this medication by mouth with or without food with a full glass of liquid (8 ounces/240 milliliters) as directed by your doctor. This medication is best taken on an empty stomach, but taking it with food may help decrease stomach upset. Do not lie down for 10 minutes after taking this medication. Do not crush or chew extended-release tablets. Doing so can release all of the drug at once, increasing the risk of side effects. Also, do not split the tablets unless they have a score line and your doctor or pharmacist tells you to do so. Swallow the whole or split tablet without crushing or chewing. There are different brands and forms of this medication available. Not all have identical effects. Do not change quinidine products without talking to your doctor or pharmacist. Dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment. If you are taking regular-release quinidine for an irregular heartbeat, the manufacturer recommends that you take no more than 4 grams daily. Use this medication regularly to get the most benefit from it. To help you remember, take it at the same time(s) each day.

Side Effects

Diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, stomach pain/cramps, or a burning feeling in throat or chest (e.g., heartburn) may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly. Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: vision changes, eye pain, muscle pain, unusual sweating or shakiness (signs of low blood sugar), unexplained fever/signs of infection (e.g., persistent sore throat), easy bruising/bleeding, extreme tiredness, dark urine, persistent nausea/vomiting, yellowing eyes/skin, lupus-like symptoms (joint/muscle pain, chest pain). Get medical help right away if you have any very serious side effects, including: severe dizziness, fainting, sudden change in heartbeat (faster/slower/more irregular). A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing. One type of reaction (cinchonism) can occur after even a single dose of this drug. Contact your doctor of pharmacist promptly if you notice symptoms such as ringing in the ears, sudden hearing problems, headache, blurred vision, confusion. Your dosage may need to be adjusted. Certain long-acting brands of quinidine may appear as a whole tablet in the stool. This is the empty shell left after the medicine has been absorbed by the body. It is harmless. This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

Drug Interactions

Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor's approval. Some products that may interact with this drug include: large amounts of antacids (e.g., sodium bicarbonate), arbutamine, aripiprazole, atomoxetine, barbiturates (e.g., phenobarbital), carbamazepine, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (e.g., acetazolamide), cisapride, etravirine, fingolimod, fosamprenavir, medication for high blood pressure (e.g., nifedipine, verapamil, diltiazem), loperamide, certain macrolide antibiotics (e.g., erythromycin, clarithromycin), phenytoin, propafenone, quinupristin/dalfopristin, rifamycins (e.g., rifampin, rifabutin). Other medications can affect the removal of quinidine from your body, which may affect how quinidine works. Examples include cobicistat, mifepristone, certain azole antifungals (including fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, posaconazole, voriconazole), certain protease inhibitors (such as nelfinavir, ritonavir, tipranavir), among others. This medication can slow down the removal of other medications from your body, which may affect how they work. Examples of affected drugs include aliskiren, digoxin, mefloquine, tricyclic antidepressants (such as desipramine, imipramine), among others. Many drugs besides quinidine may affect the heart rhythm (QT prolongation), including artemether/lumefantrine, ranolazine, toremifene, antiarrhythmic drugs (such as amiodarone, disopyramide, dofetilide, dronedarone, ibutilide, procainamide, sotalol), antipsychotics (such as pimozide, thioridazine, ziprasidone), certain quinolone antibiotics (grepafloxacin, sparfloxacin), among others. Quinidine is very similar to quinine. Do not use medications containing quinine while using quinidine.

In Case of Overdose

Symptoms of overdose may include: severe dizziness/fainting, hallucinations, seizures. If someone has overdosed and has serious symptoms such as passing out or trouble breathing, call 911. Otherwise, call a poison control center right away. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222.

In Case of Missed Dose

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember. If it is near the time of the next dose, skip the missed dose and resume your usual dosing schedule. Do not double the dose to catch up.

Storage

Store at room temperature away from light and moisture. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep all medications away from children and pets.