Levemir Flexpen

Drug List

Levemir Flexpen

Drug Name

Levemir Flexpen (Insulin detemir (rDNA origin))

Manufactured By

Novo Nordisk Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Drug Savings

Nationwide Prescription Connection (NPC) is an experienced advocacy service that helps connect patients to manufacturer provided free and discount programs. We can help the uninsured, under insured, those in the Medicare gap also known as the "doughnut hole", or even those needing help with expensive co-pays.  Our web site makes it easy for you to enter the medications you are taking, along with some basic patient information, and then finds the program that is right for you.

NPC's mission is your health. We recognize your need for help when you are applying for discount programs for your prescription medications. We consist of friendly and experienced advocates that not only know how these free and discount programs work, but are ready to help. We are available to take your call and answer any questions you may have as you search for the right program to fit your needs. We can also explain any supporting material you may need to provide as you apply for these programs. If for any reason you are denied, we also are experienced in the best appeals process with a high success rate.

Class

Treats Disease/Condition

Uses

Insulin detemir is used with a proper diet and exercise program to control high blood sugar in people with diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Insulin detemir is a man-made product that is similar to human insulin. It replaces the insulin that your body would normally make. It acts longer than regular insulin, providing a low, steady level of insulin. It works by helping blood sugar (glucose) get into cells so your body can use it for energy. Insulin detemir may be used with a shorter-acting insulin product. It may also be used alone or with other diabetes drugs (such as metformin, exenatide).

How To Use

Learn all preparation and usage instructions from your health care professional and the product package. Before using, check this product visually for particles or discoloration. If either is present, do not use the insulin. Insulin detemir should be clear and colorless. Before injecting each dose, clean the injection site with rubbing alcohol. Change the injection site each time to lessen injury under the skin and to avoid developing problems under the skin (lipodystrophy). Insulin detemir may be injected in the stomach area, the thigh, or the back of the upper arm. Do not inject into a vein or muscle because very low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) may occur. Do not rub the area after the injection. Do not inject into skin that is red, swollen, or itchy. Do not inject cold insulin because this can be painful. The insulin container you are currently using can be kept at room temperature (see also Storage section). Do not shake the container. Inject this medication under the skin as directed by your doctor, usually once or twice daily. Insulin detemir is usually injected with the evening meal or at bedtime. If you are using it twice a day, inject as directed by your doctor, usually your first dose in the morning and your second dose with the evening meal, at bedtime, or 12 hours after the morning dose. Use this medication regularly to get the most benefit from it. To help you remember, use it at the same times each day.

Side Effects

Injection site reactions (such as pain, redness, irritation) and swelling of the hands/feet may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly. Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: signs of low potassium level in the blood (such as muscle cramps, weakness, irregular heartbeat). This medication can cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). This may occur if you do not consume enough calories from food or if you do unusually heavy exercise. Symptoms of low blood sugar include sudden sweating, shaking, fast heartbeat, hunger, blurred vision, dizziness, or tingling hands/feet. It is a good habit to carry glucose tablets or gel to treat low blood sugar. If you don't have these reliable forms of glucose, rapidly raise your blood sugar by eating a quick source of sugar such as table sugar, honey, or candy, or drink fruit juice or non-diet soda. Tell your doctor right away about the reaction and the use of this product. To help prevent low blood sugar, eat meals on a regular schedule, and do not skip meals. Check with your doctor or pharmacist to find out what you should do if you miss a meal. Symptoms of high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) include thirst, increased urination, confusion, drowsiness, flushing, rapid breathing, and fruity breath odor. If these symptoms occur, tell your doctor right away. Your dosage may need to be increased. A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing. This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

Drug Interactions

Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor's approval. A product that may interact with this drug is: rosiglitazone. Beta-blocker medications (such as metoprolol, propranolol, glaucoma eye drops such as timolol) may prevent the fast/pounding heartbeat you would usually feel when your blood sugar level falls too low (hypoglycemia). Other symptoms of low blood sugar, such as dizziness, hunger, or sweating, are unaffected by these drugs. Many drugs can affect your blood sugar levels, making it more difficult to control your blood sugar. Before you start, stop, or change any medication, talk with your doctor or pharmacist about how the medication may affect your blood sugar. Check your blood sugar levels regularly as directed by your doctor. Tell your doctor about the results and of any symptoms of high or low blood sugar. (See also Side Effects section.) Your doctor may need to adjust your anti-diabetic medication, exercise program, or diet.

In Case of Overdose

Symptoms of overdose may include: signs of low blood sugar such as sweating, shakiness, loss of consciousness, fast heartbeat. If someone has overdosed and has serious symptoms such as passing out or trouble breathing, call 911. Otherwise, call a poison control center right away. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222.

In Case of Missed Dose

It is very important to follow your insulin regimen exactly. Ask your doctor ahead of time what you should do if you miss a dose of insulin.

Storage

It is best to refrigerate all unopened insulin products. Unopened insulin detemir may also be stored at room temperature, but it must be thrown away after 42 days. Opened insulin detemir vials may be stored in the refrigerator or at room temperature. Opened insulin detemir cartridges and pens can only be stored at room temperature and should not be refrigerated. Throw away all insulin detemir in use after 42 days, even if there is insulin left. Also throw away all insulin products after the expiration date on the package. Do not freeze and do not use insulin that has been frozen.