Erbitux

Drug List

Erbitux

Drug Name

Erbitux (Cetuximab)

Manufactured By

Eli Lilly and Company

Drug Savings

Nationwide Prescription Connection (NPC) is an experienced advocacy service that helps connect patients to manufacturer provided free and discount programs. We can help the uninsured, under insured, those in the Medicare gap also known as the "doughnut hole", or even those needing help with expensive co-pays.  Our web site makes it easy for you to enter the medications you are taking, along with some basic patient information, and then finds the program that is right for you.

NPC's mission is your health. We recognize your need for help when you are applying for discount programs for your prescription medications. We consist of friendly and experienced advocates that not only know how these free and discount programs work, but are ready to help. We are available to take your call and answer any questions you may have as you search for the right program to fit your needs. We can also explain any supporting material you may need to provide as you apply for these programs. If for any reason you are denied, we also are experienced in the best appeals process with a high success rate.

Treats Disease/Condition

Uses

What works? Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article. Featured article » Cetuximab injection is given with radiation treatment and other medicines to treat cancer in the colon and rectal area, and cancer in the head and neck area. This medicine is usually given to patients who have already received other cancer treatments. Cetuximab should only be used in patients with metastatic (cancer that spreads to other parts of the body) colon or rectal cancer

How To Use

Medicines used to treat cancer are very strong and can have many side effects. Before receiving this medicine, make sure you understand all the risks and benefits. It is important for you to work closely with your doctor during your treatment. You will receive this medicine while you are in a hospital or cancer treatment center. A nurse or other trained health professional will give you this medicine. Your doctor will prescribe your dose and schedule. This medicine is given through a needle placed in a vein. This medicine needs to be given slowly, so the needle will remain in place for at least 1 hour. The first dose of this medicine could take 2 hours to give. You may also receive a medicine to help prevent an allergic reaction. You will need to stay in the hospital or cancer treatment center for at least 1 hour after you have received the medicine. You might need to stay longer if you have any signs of an allergic reaction.

Side Effects

Micromedex Consumer Medication Information. Published: October 1, 2016 Cetuximab (By injection) se-TUX-i-mab Treats cancer, including head, neck, and colorectal cancer. Drug classes Antineoplastic Agent (About this - PubMed Health) Uses Uses of This Medicine Cetuximab injection is given with radiation treatment and other medicines to treat cancer in the colon and rectal area, and cancer in the head and neck area. This medicine is usually given to patients who have already received other cancer treatments. Cetuximab should only be used in patients with metastatic (cancer that spreads to other parts of the body) colon or rectal cancer who have had a KRAS gene mutation test. This test helps the doctor decide whether the medicine will treat their cancer. Cetuximab interferes with the growth of cancer cells, which are then destroyed by the body. Since the growth of normal body cells may also be affected by cetuximab, other effects will also occur. Some of these may be serious and must be reported to your doctor. Other effects, such as a skin rash, may not be serious but may cause concern. Some effects do not occur until months or years after the medicine is used. Before you begin treatment with cetuximab, you and your doctor should talk about the benefits this medicine will do as well as the risks of using it. This medicine will only be given by or under the immediate supervision of your doctor. Other uses (PubMed Health) How To Use Injectable Medicines used to treat cancer are very strong and can have many side effects. Before receiving this medicine, make sure you understand all the risks and benefits. It is important for you to work closely with your doctor during your treatment. You will receive this medicine while you are in a hospital or cancer treatment center. A nurse or other trained health professional will give you this medicine. Your doctor will prescribe your dose and schedule. This medicine is given through a needle placed in a vein. This medicine needs to be given slowly, so the needle will remain in place for at least 1 hour. The first dose of this medicine could take 2 hours to give. You may also receive a medicine to help prevent an allergic reaction. You will need to stay in the hospital or cancer treatment center for at least 1 hour after you have received the medicine. You might need to stay longer if you have any signs of an allergic reaction. Missed dose: This medicine needs to be given on a fixed schedule. If you miss a dose, call your doctor, home health caregiver, or treatment clinic for instructions. Drugs and Foods to Avoid Ask your doctor or pharmacist before using any other medicine, including over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Some medicines can affect how cetuximab works. Tell your doctor if you are using cisplatin. When Not To Use This medicine is not right for everyone. Do not use it if you had an allergic reaction to cetuximab. Warnings This medicine may cause birth defects if either partner is using it during conception or pregnancy. Tell your doctor right away if you or your partner becomes pregnant. Continue to use birth control for 6 months after your last dose of cetuximab. Do not breastfeed while you are using cetuximab and for at least 60 days after you receive your last dose. Tell your doctor if you have heart or blood vessel disease, heart rhythm problems, a lung disease, or if you have a mineral imbalance such as low levels of potassium, magnesium, or calcium. This medicine may make your skin more sensitive to sunlight. Wear sunscreen. Do not use sunlamps or tanning beds. Your doctor will do lab tests at regular visits to check on the effects of this medicine. Keep all appointments. Possible side effects Summary More details Call your doctor right away if you notice any of these side effects: Allergic reaction: Itching or hives, swelling in your face or hands, swelling or tingling in your mouth or throat, chest tightness, trouble breathing Blistering, peeling, red skin rash Change in how much or how often you urinate Chest pain, shortness of breath, or coughing up blood Dry mouth, increased thirst, or muscle cramps Headache, bone pain, or back pain Lightheadedness, fainting Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, loss of appetite, or stomach pain Pain, itching, burning, swelling, or a lump under your skin where the needle is placed Swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet Trouble breathing or swallowing Unusual bleeding, bruising, or weakness If you notice these less serious side effects, talk with your doctor: Acne Depression, anxiety, or confusion Sores or white patches on your lips, mouth, or throat Trouble sleeping If you notice other side effects that you think are caused by this medicine, tell your doctor.

Drug Interactions

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. Tell your healthcare professional if you are taking any other prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicine.

In Case of Overdose

In Case of Missed Dose

This medicine needs to be given on a fixed schedule. If you miss a dose, call your doctor, home health caregiver, or treatment clinic for instructions.

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