Butrans

Drug List

Butrans

Drug Name

Butrans (Buprenorphine)

Manufactured By

Purdue Pharmaceutical Products LP

Drug Savings

NPC's mission is your health. We recognize your need for help when you are applying for discount programs for your prescription medications. We consist of friendly and experienced advocates that not only know how these free and discount programs work, but are ready to help. We are available to take your call and answer any questions you may have as you search for the right program to fit your needs. We can also explain any supporting material you may need to provide as you apply for these programs. If for any reason you are denied, we also are experienced in the best appeals process with a high success rate.

Nationwide Prescription Connection (NPC) is an experienced advocacy service that helps connect patients to manufacturer provided free and discount programs. We can help the uninsured, under insured, those in the Medicare gap also known as the "doughnut hole", or even those needing help with expensive co-pays.  Our web site makes it easy for you to enter the medications you are taking, along with some basic patient information, and then finds the program that is right for you.

Treats Disease/Condition

Uses

This medication is used to help relieve severe ongoing pain (such as due to arthritis, chronic back pain). Buprenorphine belongs to a class of drugs known as opioid (narcotic) analgesics. It works in the brain to change how your body feels and responds to pain. The higher strengths of this drug (7.5, 10, 15, or 20 micrograms per hour patches) should be used only if you have been regularly taking moderate amounts of opioid pain medication. These strengths may cause overdose (even death) if used by a person who has not been regularly taking opioids. Do not use this medication to relieve pain that is mild or that will go away in a few days. This medication is not for occasional ("as needed") use.

How To Use

Read the Medication Guide and, if available, the Patient Information Leaflet provided by your pharmacist before you start using this medication and each time you get a refill. Learn how to properly use, store, and discard the patches. If you have any questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist. Use this medication on a regular schedule as directed by your doctor, not as needed for sudden (breakthrough) pain. If you are already using an opioid medication, ask your doctor or pharmacist if you should stop or change how you use your other opioid medication. It may take 24 hours or longer before you have pain relief from buprenorphine patches. Other pain relievers (such as acetaminophen, ibuprofen) may also be prescribed. Ask your doctor or pharmacist about using buprenorphine safely with other drugs. Apply this medication to the skin as directed by your doctor. Do not apply on burns, cuts, irritated skin, or skin that has been exposed to radiation (x-ray treatment). Select a dry, non-hairy area on a flat part of your body, such as the upper chest, sides of the chest, upper back, or upper outer arms. In people unable to think clearly (such as due to dementia), apply the patch on the upper back to lessen the chance it might be removed or placed in the mouth. If there is hair on the skin, use scissors to clip the hair as close as possible to the skin. Do not shave hair since this might cause skin irritation. If needed, use water to clean the area. Do not use soap, oils, lotions, or alcohol on the application site. Dry the skin well before applying the patch. The patch is usually changed every 7 days. To avoid irritation, apply to a different area each time and do not apply to the same site within 3 weeks. Be sure to remove the old patch before applying a new patch. The used patch should be folded in half with the sticky sides together and properly discarded. If your manufacturer has supplied a patch disposal unit, follow directions for its use. Do not use the patch if it appears to be broken, cut, or damaged. Remove from the sealed pouch, peel off the protective liner, and apply right away to the skin. Press firmly in place with the palm of the hand for about 15 to 30 seconds, making sure the contact is complete (especially around the edges). If your prescribed dose is for more than one patch, apply them right next to each other but make sure the edges of the patches do not touch or overlap. After applying the patch, wash your hands with water only. You may bathe, shower, or swim while wearing the patch. If you have problems with the patch not sticking at the application site, you may tape the edges in place with certain kinds of clear tape. Ask your doctor or pharmacist about which type of tape should be used. If this problem persists, ask your doctor for advice. If the patch falls off before 7 days, a new patch may be applied to a different skin site. Be sure to let your doctor know if this happens. If you accidentally touch the sticky layer to your skin or handle a cut or damaged patch, wash the area well with clear water. If the patch comes off and accidentally sticks to the skin of another person, immediately remove the patch, wash the area with water, and get medical help for them right away. Do not use soap, alcohol, or other products to wash the area. The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment. Do not apply more patches than directed, change them more frequently, or use them for a longer time than prescribed. Your risk for side effects will increase.

Side Effects

Nausea, vomiting, constipation, lightheadedness, dizziness, drowsiness, dry mouth, or headache may occur. Irritation, itching, or redness at the application site may also occur. Some of these side effects may decrease after you have been using this medication for a while. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly. To prevent constipation, eat a diet adequate in fiber, drink plenty of water, and exercise. Ask your pharmacist for help in selecting a laxative (such as a stimulant type with stool softener). To reduce the risk of dizziness and lightheadedness, get up slowly when rising from a sitting or lying position. Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: mental/mood changes (such as agitation, confusion, hallucinations), difficulty urinating, swelling/blistering at the patch application site, signs of your adrenal glands not working well (such as unusual tiredness, weight loss). Get medical help right away if you have any very serious side effects, including: fainting, seizure, slow/shallow breathing, unusual drowsiness/difficulty waking up, fast/irregular heartbeat, severe dizziness. This drug may rarely cause serious liver disease. Get medical help right away if you have any symptoms of liver damage, including: dark urine, persistent nausea/vomiting, loss of appetite, yellowing eyes/skin, severe stomach/abdominal pain. A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing. This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

Drug Interactions

Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor's approval. Some products that may interact with this drug include: certain pain medications (mixed opioid agonist-antagonists such as pentazocine, nalbuphine, butorphanol), opioid antagonists (such as naltrexone). Many drugs besides buprenorphine may affect the heart rhythm (QT prolongation), including amiodarone, dofetilide, disopyramide, quinidine, procainamide, sotalol, among others. The risk of serious side effects (such as slow/shallow breathing, severe drowsiness/dizziness) may be increased if this medication is used with other products that may also affect breathing or cause drowsiness. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking other products such as alcohol, antihistamines (such as cetirizine, diphenhydramine), drugs for sleep or anxiety (such as alprazolam, diazepam, zolpidem), muscle relaxants (such as carisoprodol, cyclobenzaprine), and other narcotic pain relievers (such as codeine, hydrocodone). Check the labels on all your medicines (such as allergy or cough-and-cold products) because they may contain ingredients that cause drowsiness. Ask your pharmacist about using those products safely. This medication may interfere with certain laboratory tests (including amylase/lipase levels), possibly causing false test results. Make sure laboratory personnel and all your doctors know you use this drug.

In Case of Overdose

Symptoms of overdose may include: slow/shallow breathing, slow heartbeat, loss of consciousness. This medication patch may be harmful if chewed or swallowed. If someone has overdosed, remove the patch if possible. For serious symptoms such as passing out or trouble breathing, call 911. Otherwise, call a poison control center right away. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222.

In Case of Missed Dose

If you forget to change a patch on your scheduled day, remove the patch and apply a new one as soon as you remember. Do not wear extra patches to make up a missed dose.

Storage

Store at 25°C (77°F); excursions permitted between 15°C - 30°C (59°F - 86°F)