Apokyn

Drug List

Apokyn

Drug Name

Apokyn (Apomorphine hydrochloride)

Manufactured By

Abbott Laboratories

Drug Savings


Nationwide Prescription Connection (NPC) is an experienced advocacy service that helps connect patients to manufacturer provided free and discount programs. We can help the uninsured, under insured, those in the Medicare gap also known as the "doughnut hole", or even those needing help with expensive co-pays.  Our web site makes it easy for you to enter the medications you are taking, along with some basic patient information, and then finds the program that is right for you.


NPC's mission is your health. We recognize your need for help when you are applying for discount programs for your prescription medications. We consist of friendly and experienced advocates that not only know how these free and discount programs work, but are ready to help. We are available to take your call and answer any questions you may have as you search for the right program to fit your needs. We can also explain any supporting material you may need to provide as you apply for these programs. If for any reason you are denied, we also are experienced in the best appeals process with a high success rate.

Treats Disease/Condition

Uses

This medication is used to treat the symptoms of Parkinson's disease. It can improve your ability to move during frequent "off" periods. It can decrease shakiness (tremor), stiffness, slowed movement, and unsteadiness. This medication is thought to work by helping to restore the balance of a certain natural substance (dopamine) in the brain. Apomorphine is used to treat "off" episodes when they occur. It is not used to prevent "off" episodes. This drug should not be used instead of your usual medications for Parkinson's disease. Continue taking all your medications as directed by your doctor.

How To Use

Learn all preparation and usage instructions in the product package. If any of the information is unclear, consult your doctor or pharmacist. Before using, check this product visually for particles or discoloration. If either is present, do not use the liquid. Check the dose carefully before injecting. Apomorphine is given by the milliliter, not by the milligram. There are 10 milligrams of drug in each milliliter of this liquid, so if the wrong measuring unit is used, you may accidentally inject 10 times the amount of drug you need. Be sure you have the correct dose to prevent accidental overdose. If you are not sure how to measure your dose correctly, consult your pharmacist before injecting. If you are using the prefilled cartridge/pen, keep track of the doses used to make sure there is enough medication left in the device to give you a full dose. Clean the injection site before injecting. Inject this medication under the skin as needed to treat decreased/frozen muscle movement ("off" episode) as directed by your doctor. You may need to use this medication several times a day. Do not use a second injection for the same "off" episode. Wait at least 2 hours between injections. Do not inject this medication into a vein. It is important to change the location of the injection site with each dose to avoid problem areas under the skin. Therefore, choose a different injection site with each dose. The abdomen, thighs, and upper arms are recommended sites for the injection. Do not inject into skin that is irritated, sore, or infected. Learn how to store and discard needles and medical supplies safely. Never reuse syringes or needles. Consult your pharmacist for details. Use this medication as prescribed. If you stop using this medication for longer than 1 week, you may need to increase your dose slowly back to your previous dosage. Talk with your doctor about how to restart the medication. Do not stop using this medication without your doctor's approval. If you have been using this medication frequently and suddenly stop using this drug, withdrawal reactions may occur. Such reactions can include fever, muscle stiffness, and confusion. Report any such reactions to your doctor right away.

Side Effects

Redness/swelling/pain/itching at the injection site, nausea, vomiting, headache, sweating, dizziness, drowsiness, yawning, or runny nose may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly. Tell your doctor right away if any of these unlikely but serious side effects occur: uncontrolled movements, mental/mood changes (e.g., depression, hallucinations, trouble sleeping), muscle cramps/spasm, swelling of the hands/legs/ankles/feet, unusual strong urges (such as increased gambling, increased sexual urges). Seek immediate medical attention if any of these rare but very serious side effects occur: chest pain, shortness of breath, unusually fast/pounding/irregular heartbeat, severe dizziness, fainting, slurred speech, vision changes, weakness on one side of the body. Some people using apomorphine have fallen asleep suddenly during their usual daily activities (such as talking on the phone, driving). In some cases, sleep occurred without any feelings of drowsiness beforehand. This sleep effect may occur anytime during treatment with apomorphine even if you have used this medication for a long time. If you experience increased sleepiness or fall asleep during the day, do not drive or take part in other possibly dangerous activities until you have discussed this effect with your doctor. Your risk of this sleep effect is increased by using alcohol or other medications that can make you drowsy. See also Precautions section. You may also develop a sudden drop in blood pressure that can cause dizziness, nausea, and fainting. This effect may also increase your risk of a fall. This drop in blood pressure is more likely when you are first starting the medication, when your dose is increased, or when you get up suddenly. To lower your risk, get up slowly from a sitting or lying position. Avoid alcohol. For males, in the very unlikely event you have a painful, prolonged erection (lasting more than 4 hours), stop using this drug and seek immediate medical attention, or permanent problems could occur. A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, seek immediate medical attention if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing. This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

Drug Interactions

Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor's approval. Some products that may interact with this drug include: alosetron, antipsychotics (e.g., chlorpromazine, haloperidol, thiothixene), certain drugs for nausea (e.g., metoclopramide, phenothiazines such as prochlorperazine, serotonin blockers such as ondansetron, granisetron), drugs for high blood pressure (e.g., beta blockers such as atenolol), vasodilators (e.g., nitrates), "water pills" (diuretics such as furosemide, thiazides). Many drugs besides apomorphine may affect the heart rhythm (QT prolongation), including amiodarone, dofetilide, pimozide, procainamide, quinidine, sotalol, macrolide antibiotics (such as erythromycin), among others. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking other products that cause drowsiness including alcohol, antihistamines (such as cetirizine, diphenhydramine), drugs for sleep or anxiety (such as alprazolam, diazepam, zolpidem), muscle relaxants (such as carisoprodol, cyclobenzaprine), and narcotic pain relievers (such as codeine, hydrocodone). Check the labels on all your medicines (such as allergy or cough-and-cold products) because they may contain ingredients that cause drowsiness. Ask your pharmacist about using those products safely.

In Case of Overdose

Symptoms of overdose may include: very severe nausea/vomiting, loss of consciousness. If someone has overdosed and has serious symptoms such as passing out or trouble breathing, call 911. Otherwise, call a poison control center right away. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222.

In Case of Missed Dose

Not applicable

Storage

Store at room temperature at 77 degrees F (25 degrees C) away from light and moisture. Brief storage between 59-86 degrees F (15-30 degrees C) is permitted. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep all medicines away from children and pets. Syringes can be filled the night before use and stored in the refrigerator until the next day. Discard this type of pre-filled syringe if not used in 24 hours