Ammonul

Drug List

Ammonul

Drug Name

Ammonul (Sodium Phenylacetate and Sodium Benzoate)

Manufactured By

Cangene bioPharma Inc.

Drug Savings


Nationwide Prescription Connection (NPC) is an experienced advocacy service that helps connect patients to manufacturer provided free and discount programs. We can help the uninsured, under insured, those in the Medicare gap also known as the "doughnut hole", or even those needing help with expensive co-pays.  Our web site makes it easy for you to enter the medications you are taking, along with some basic patient information, and then finds the program that is right for you.


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Treats Disease/Condition

Uses

Sodium phenylacetate and benzoate injection combination is used to treat hyperammonemia, which is a condition where there is too much ammonia in the blood. Ammonia is formed from the breakdown of protein in the body. If the ammonia cannot be removed by the body, high amounts in the blood may cause serious unwanted effects. This medicine works to reduce the amount of ammonia in the blood. This medicine is to be given only by or under the direct supervision of a doctor.

How To Use

A nurse or other trained health professional will give you or your child this medicine in a hospital. This medicine is given through a needle placed in one of your veins. Your doctor will give you or your child a few doses of this medicine until your condition improves, and then switch you to an oral medicine that works the same way. If you have any concerns about this, talk to your doctor. It is also important that you follow any special diet instructions from your doctor, such as using a low protein diet. If you have any questions about this, check with your doctor.

Side Effects

Abdominal or stomach pain or cramps; blurred vision; decreased urine; dry mouth; fatigue; flushed dry skin; fruit like breath; increased hunger; increased thirst; increased urination, irregular heartbeat; loss of appitie,; muscle pain, nausea or vomiting; numbness or tingling in the hands, feet, or lips; seizures, shortness of breath; sweating; troubled breathing; unexplained weight loss; unusual tiredness or weakness.

Drug Interactions

Formal drug interaction studies have not been performed with AMMONUL. Some antibiotics such as penicillin may compete with phenylacetylglutamine and hippurate for active secretion by renal tubules, which may affect the overall disposition of the infused drug. Probenecid is known to inhibit the renal transport of many organic compounds, including aminohippuric acid, and may affect renal excretion of phenylacetylglutamine and hippurate. There have been reports that valproic acid can induce hyperammonemia through inhibition of the synthesis of N-acetylglutamate, a co-factor for carbamyl phosphate synthetase. Therefore, administration of valproic acid to patients with urea cycle disorders may exacerbate their condition and antagonize the efficacy of AMMONUL. Use of corticosteroids may cause a protein catabolic state and, thereby, potentially increase plasma ammonia levels in patients with impaired ability to form urea.

In Case of Overdose

Overdosage has been reported during AMMONUL treatment in urea cycle-deficient patients. All patients in the uncontrolled open-label study were to be treated with the same dose of AMMONUL. However, some patients received more than the dose level specified in the protocol. In 16 of the 64 deaths, the patient received a known overdose of AMMONUL. Causes of death in these patients included cardiorespiratory failure/arrest (6 patients), hyperammonemia (3 patients), increased intracranial pressure (2 patients), pneumonitis with septic shock and coagulopathy (1 patient), error in dialysis procedure (1 patient), respiratory failure (1 patient), intractable hypotension and probable sepsis (1 patient), and unknown (1 patient). Additionally, other signs of intoxication may include obtundation (in the absence of hyperammonemia), hyperventilation, a severe compensated metabolic acidosis, perhaps with a respiratory component, large anion gap, hypernatremia and hyperosmolarity, progressive encephalopathy, cardiovascular collapse, and death. In case of overdose of AMMONUL, discontinue the drug and institute appropriate emergency medical monitoring and procedures. In severe cases, the latter may include hemodialysis (procedure of choice) or peritoneal dialysis (when hemodialysis is unavailable).

In Case of Missed Dose

Storage